#UK Are you an active or passive candidate?

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Statistics show that 75 per cent of global candidates are ‘passive job seekers’ – How are you positioned to take advantage of every opportunity out there? Tristan Drane, founder and managing director of The One Group, reports.

Passive candidates can be defined as individuals who are not actively seeking a new job role, due to either being satisfied in their current role, being part of an ongoing project or simply a lack of motivation to seek opportunity. 

An active candidate takes action to find a better vocation, to improve career prospects and in theory give themselves more opportunity for change.

Is it better to be an active or passive candidate?

The type of candidate you should aim to be is highly dependent on which sector or type of industry you work within. Sectors such as administration, customer service and sales are often seen as more ‘disposable’ skill sets, with willing replacements said to be easier to find. 

As a candidate working in this employer led environment, you cannot afford to be as passive and will likely benefit from actively making yourself accessible to potential employers either via numerous jobs applications, adding your details to a CV database or engaging with recruitment agency. 
 
On the other hand, industries prizing more niche or deeper skill sets, such as Technology, Engineering or Scientific, candidates are often in high demand and so can afford to be a little more passive in their approach. 

Forbes found that only 30 per cent of the global tech workforce are actively seeking for more – putting greater emphasis on the employer to go out and find them. The question for this group of candidates is, even if you have a desirable skill set to offer, are you in the right places to be discovered?

As a short answer, no it is not better to solely an active or passive, the first question you need to ask yourself is where do I fit on the scale below? Are you in a low skilled environment needing to work that bit harder to find new opportunity, are you highly skilled and can afford to take a foot off the gas or like most of us are you somewhere in the middle just looking to make yourself that little bit more desirable to a potential employer?

How desirable do you think you are?

As mentioned, your ability to be recognised and plucked from the talent pool will be relative to the environment in which you work, the demand for your particular skill set and your competition. There are three fundamentals to making yourself desirable to potential employers.

A candidate, either passively or actively searching for a new role while still in full time employment is far more desirable than an individual who is currently unemployed. 

Your worth and value as an employee is far easier to demonstrate – with recruiters and employers able to see the difference your role is making in real-time, without having to rely on a snippet from your CV. 

Don’t wait until you’re at the end of the road to start your job search, whether you are looking or not keep an open mind, flag yourself as open to new opportunities.  

Many passive and even some active candidates continue to rely on outdated CV’s and old profiles, if you haven’t added those latest qualifications, skills or work placements, how can you expect recruiters and prospective employers to know your true potential. Is there something that could add to push you up the skills scale? Is this something you already have in your armoury? Or is this something new you could explore?

All the statistics point to passion and drive being the way to fill a skills gap. According to a survey conducted by The Polling Company, 70 per cent of talent acquisition leaders, and 51 per cent of recruiters push forward candidates with greater motivation and drive.

Although difficult to demonstrate on paper, research also backs this up suggesting that 9/10 recruiters preferred to hire active candidates; could this be the route to making yourself more desirable if you are lower on the skills scale?

Five tips for making yourself accessible 

You have decided where you sit on the in skills model, you know how active or passive you need to be to create a new opportunity for yourself and you have updated your profile to help maximise your potential and saleability. Here’s five steps to ensure you’re making yourself discoverable and taking advantage of every opportunity that comes your way.

1. Build your online brand
How discoverable are you? Could a potential employer find you with a quick search? According to research conducted by Aberdeen Group, a staggering 73 per cent of millennials found their last job through a social networking platform.

  1. Upload your CV to relevant job boards (Completing additional profile information where applicable)
  2. Update LinkedIn profile – Does this match your CV? Have your declared yourself as open to opportunity?
  3. Do your other social media platforms give the right impression?  

2. Talk to a recruiter 
Not all recruiters are created equal. Upload your CV to relevant local and specialist recruiters.

3. Fill a skills gap
Look at your peers, is there a skill or qualification that could complement your current skill set or make you eligible for your dream job?

4. Be confident 
Approachability and preparation are key to success when searching for a new role – be confident in your ability, be willing to clearly communicate experience and explain your career choices.

5. Be Motivated 
Show passion and drive within your role and towards any potential opportunity: According to a survey conducted by The Polling Company the top reason (51 per cent) for passive candidates not being successful in their new roles is due to showing a lack of passion and commitment. 

theonegroup.co.uk

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2FE38Ox

Posted in #UK

#UK Cambridge innovation helps Draper Esprit transform mega-VC investments

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Gamechanging VC firm Draper Esprit believes Cambridge’s Science & Technology innovation brilliance is helping to transform the international investment paradigm.

CEO and co-founder Simon Cook is presiding over a golden age for the London-quoted investor and is escalating Draper Esprit’s ambitions just as Cambridge S & T trailblazers ramp their own fundraising expectations.

Cook, who cut his tech teeth in Cambridge as well as Canada and Silicon Valley, says the cluster’s top innovators are now raising much bigger sums – rounds at last commensurate with the potential of their propositions.

Having just exited from Grapeshot after its spectacular sale to US giant Oracle and led a $31 million round in Cambridge life science company Fluidic Analytics, Draper Esprit is perfectly primed to take the temperature of the  global investment climate.

Cook says he is not surprised that brilliant Cambridge science and technology is finally realising optimum valuations. And he is convinced that major acquisitions creating new millionaires at companies like Arm and Grapeshot will lead to more exciting tech startups – and fresh opportunities to breed internationally influential unicorns.

Cook’s team intends to drive home those points at an exciting Cambridge event on February 6 at the Tamburlaine Hotel in Station Road at the heart of the city’s burgeoning tech quarter.

Cutting edge entrepreneurs will share their success stories and underline the unprecedented opportunities awaiting new generations of Cambridge startups. Among them will be John Snyder, founder and CEO of Grapeshot, Andrew Lynn (CEO of Fluidic Analytics), Sarah Bateup, chief clinical officer of Ieso Digital Health; Tim Brears, CEO of Evonetix; Kerry Baldwin, managing partner of IQ Capital and Dr Vishal Gulati, venture partner with Draper Esprit.

Grapeshot John Snyder
Grapeshot founder John Snyder

Cook told me: “Our heritage is Cambridge although we have not done anything quite like this event before. We were always very active in Cambridge but in a new and vibrant climate we felt it was a good time to reinforce the proposition.

“We back brilliant teams with global ambition. Building a business is tough and going global even harder. If you are a founder join us at the Cambridge event and meet entrepreneurs who are doing just that.”

Cook believes the days of Cambridge companies underselling their propositions are long gone and that CEOs of exciting new tech startups are starting to raise the kind of money their propositions warrant. 

Giving the lead, Draper Esprit is willing to make investments that accelerate growth and make a difference on the world stage – injecting £20m-£30m sums rather than less effective amounts.

He said: “The ability to write bigger cheques and take more risks in order to build a bigger upside has changed quite a lot in Silicon Valley. Now Europe is catching up quite fast.

“We have seen major investments and acquisitions led from the US in the past and now Asia is becoming significant; especially China and Japan. Draper Esprit has been instrumental in starting a flow of Asian investment into the UK and Cambridge. We helped sell Neul to Huawei which is now investing heavily in the cluster. 

“We recognised early on the interest from Asia in Cambridge. While the Neul-Huawei deal price in itself was not massive, the investment Huawei has since injected into Cambridge and the UK and the potential growth for the cluster as a result is proving highly significant.

“Until fairly recent times, Europe had seemed a better route for our companies  looking internationally than Asia but a lot of relationships have developed over the last five years between Asia and Europe. They will not slow down.

“In all our years’ experience in Cambridge, the UK and globally no-one has done investments on the scale that we are witnessing and helping to drive right now. 

“Entrepreneurship is better understood. Cambridge has always had some of the best science in the world but sometimes its entrepreneurs have not been able to explain the story effectively enough to attract the right amount of investment. 

“Entrepreneurship is now embedded in younger businesses; science is a more recognised career path. There have always been one or two massive companies like Arm able to get the required uplift to grow internationally but now, with a lot more entrepreneurs on the scene, capital is really starting to flow in.

“And when you get a significant acquisition such as SoftBank’s of Arm it creates more entrepreneurs who are prepared to stay on the Cambridge scene and invest in startup opportunities.”

Cook says the situation is even more encouraging because it is no longer just the bosses who have entrepreneurial ambitions of their own; he has seen the spirit of entrepreneurship driven down to the most junior members of staff who are inspired by senior role models.

The Draper Esprit team
The Draper Esprit team

Cook believes that Cambridge entrepreneurs are also more prepared to build a global business in their own right rather than selling out short-term at the first sign of success – creating a pool of serial entrepreneurs helping to cross-pollinate new enterprises.

Draper Esprit’s strategy is to ramp up the size of its investments in truly exciting plays. Cook says: “We raised £160 million in June 2017 but you can never have too much money so our future fundraising plans remain flexible.

“Our plan is to get to a position where we are lending bigger and bigger amounts but are self financing. We invest in risk businesses so have to be prepared to lose money. 

“VCs were once prepared to lose, say, £2-3m but are now willing to lose lots more. I am really excited that we can write £20-30m cheques and absorb it.”

Cook believes that good science & technology has a habit of finding its time and opportunity to shine. He says John Snyder and Grapeshot have always had excellent technology but the explosion of fake news and web trust issues had heightened its appeal to Oracle.

Similarly CSR’s Bluetooth technology was rubbished at the outset – particularly in the US where rival technologies were being promoted – but the unrelenting push for safe, hands-free communication in cars accelerated the Cambridge proposition into overdrive based on market forces. The end result was CSR’s acquisition by US chip maker Qualcomm for $2.4 billion in 2015.
 
Cook says opportunities to invest in ahead of the curve technologies have always been around – but he adds: “What has changed is the cheque sizes. “While $10 million Series As have been normal for a while, what haven’t are the $50 million Series Bs. 

“The ability to write bigger cheques and take more risks in order to build a bigger upside has changed quite a lot in the Valley. And now, Europe is catching up quite fast.

“The funds that can break out from $150m to $500m are going to become market leaders for a long time.”

• For more details of the Cambridge event see the advertisement on Page 4 or go direct to www.draperespritevents.com/cambridge/bw

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2FwVaaS

Posted in #UK

#UK Science and tech sectors trigger Cambridge property ‘gold rush’

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Scale-up Science & Technology businesses have sparked a fresh gold rush for office and laboratory space in Cambridge – and the smart operators are negotiating pre-lets to ensure their growth plans are not torpedoed by lack of options.

New research from YouGov commissioned by Bidwells reveals that the demand for office and lab space in Cambridge is close to 1.3 million sq ft – the highest level since 2014 when AstraZeneca decided to move from the UK’s North West to the Cambridge Biomedical Campus. This takes account of current pre-let commitments. 

The race for space is set to quicken as S & T businesses plan to dramatically ramp up their spend on Research & Development. The faster they grow their operations and scale headcount, the more urgent becomes their need to broker sufficient space to accommodate them into their expansion strategies.

Bidwells’ director of research, Sue Foxley, told Business Weekly: “Our latest analysis of the Cambridge office and laboratory market finds that 0.6 million sq ft of new space will complete during the first half of 2019. 

“This is the largest increase in supply in over a decade which perhaps sounds alarm bells for some given the apparent slowdown in demand for labs and offices combined to 1.154m sq ft at the end of 2018.

“The reality of the market paints a different picture. The vast majority (85 per cent) of this space is pre-let or already under offer. This, in theory, leaves a total of 91,000 sq ft available during 2019. 

“Given our understanding of current requirements, we expect more than 50 per cent of this space will be let shortly after practical completion.” 

Given such unrelenting demand there is inevitably a price to pay. The pre-letting activity, combined with a slight increase in take-up in 2018 compared to 2017, underpinned a further increase in rents. 

During the second half of 2018 the prime office rent rose to £41.50 psf, with increases also seen for all grades of second hand space. The prime rent for laboratory space rose by 1.4 per cent during 2018 to £34.50 psf.

Foxley added: “These latest lettings figures are consistent with the findings of research undertaken by Bidwells on the location and property requirements of major R & D companies. The research, undertaken by YouGov on our behalf, underlines the importance of location. 

“The ability to recruit highly skilled staff, combined with the requirement to be near the centre of research ideas and innovation are the determinants of location for such businesses. 

“With a global outlook these companies will consider location from an international perspective and therefore are compelled to be exacting in their requirements. 

“These requirements need to be taken seriously: 52 per cent of the global R & D companies participating in our survey expect their R & D budget to grow over the next five years, while 30 per cent think it likely they will take new floorspace, predominately due to expectations of business growth. 

“The availability of property to grow a business was considered extremely important, considerably more so than the cost or lease terms of that space.” 

The top three location considerations for global R & D businesses were:-

  • Ease of recruiting and retaining staff
  • Ultra-fast and high-volume data connectivity
  • Availability of property to grow R & D activity

Foxley added: “This clearly has implications for location decision-making on top of concerns over access to skills and innovation which preoccupy all knowledge based businesses. 

“Given the recent tightness in the Cambridge office and laboratories market, particularly in the accessible in demand locations, it is therefore unsurprising that such companies are opting for pre-lets. 

“With the business priority to keep pace with expectations for “continuous innovation” as noted by many of our respondents, taking the risk on the market to supply the goods, particularly for specialised laboratory space, is increasingly not an option. 

“This long term perspective towards occupational requirements of incoming and expanding companies, combined with pressures from the ecosystem of new businesses in Cambridge’s science and tech sectors in particular, will place further pressure on rents. 

“While the wider economic and political backdrop clearly remains uncertain, we expect these underlying market pressures to underpin prime rental value growth of between 2-3 per cent in 2019.”

• PHOTOGRAPH: Bidwells’ director of research, Sue Foxley

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2sxKGza

Posted in #UK

#UK Japanese pile into new £10m GeoSpock fundraising

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Japanese investors Global Brain and 31Ventures along with data tech company KDDI Supership have chipped into a fresh £10 million funding round for Cambridge UK extreme data specialist GeoSpock. 

It takes the total raised by GeoSpock to date to £19.5m – just under $25m – and is designed to fast-track transformational GeoSpock engagement with the massive Asian markets of Japan and Singapore.

GeoSpock’s unique spatial big data platform enables companies to access dynamic contextual data visualisation and programmatic analytics.

The latest investment was led by existing backers Cambridge Innovation Capital jointly with Parkwalk Advisors and Japanese firms Global Brain and 31Ventures. Japanese data tech company KDDI Supership joined as a strategic investor. Investment was also secured from existing investor, Jonathan Milner, the serial Cambridge life science entrepreneur.

The additional funding will support GeoSpock’s rapid international expansion strategy to help develop key client accounts, particularly in the strategic markets of Singapore and Japan. 

The investment will also allow the company to continue to invest in research and development, particularly in the areas of machine learning and data science.

GeoSpock is fast establishing itself as the de facto processing engine at the heart of next-generation smart infrastructure – including smart cities and the Internet of Everything. 

The company powers future mobility applications, including the management of autonomous vehicle fleets, working with businesses across the automotive, telecoms, mobility, marine, media, and retail sectors.

Victor Christou, CEO of Cambridge Innovation Capital said: “We’re delighted to lead GeoSpock’s latest funding drive, enabling this exciting company to innovate and scale globally. 

“The opportunity presented by geospatial data is huge and this funding will support GeoSpock in delivering geo-temporal data understanding and visualisation for the everything-connected world. 

“We also welcome KDDI Supership to this investment, whose expertise, particularly in Asia, will help GeoSpock widen and deepen its global reach.”

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2C74zBJ

Posted in #UK

#UK AstraZeneca and Cambridge allies identify cancer breakthrough

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Global pharma giant AstraZeneca is working with scientists at a fertile Cambridge University laboratory to commercialise potential new cancer treatments arising from critical research into the ATM protein.

Scientists in Professor Steve Jackson’s laboratory at The Gurdon Institute have identified mechanisms by which drug sensitivities characteristic of ATM-deficient cells can be counteracted by changes in other genes. 

These results are important for both understanding cancer drug resistance in the context of sporadic cancers, as well as highlighting potential therapeutic targets for the genetic disease, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T).

Mutations in the ATM gene cause devastating neurodegenerative and A-T and are also associated with various forms of sporadic cancer.

Previous work has shown that the ATM protein, which is produced from the ATM gene, serves as a molecular guardian of the genome by detecting DNA damage and promoting its repair. Consequently, A-T patients and ATM-deficient cells are hyper-sensitive to various endogenous DNA lesions that can lead to neurodegeneration, as well as DNA-damaging agents used in cancer therapy such as PARP inhibitors.

Professor Jackson said: “This study marks a major step forward in our understanding of how the ATM protein maintains genome stability and how ATM defects can cause cancer and neurodegeneration in human patients with A-T. 

“My colleagues and I are very excited by the potential clinical applications for our findings, which we now plan to actively pursue in my laboratory and with our colleagues elsewhere.”

Researchers in the lab have collaborated with colleagues at AstraZeneca to identify mechanisms by which the drug sensitivities of ATM-deficient cells can be alleviated by changes in other genes. 

Through using cutting-edge CRISPR-Cas9 genetic screens, the authors show that defects in the products of several genes also involved in DNA repair pathways, including components of the BRCA1-A complex and the non-homologous end joining factors LIG4, XRCC4 and XLF, can alleviate the hypersensitivity of ATM-deficient cells to PARP inhibitors and the chemotherapeutic drug topotecan.

As well as providing new mechanistic insights into how cells respond to DNA damage, these findings also have potential medical relevance. First, they suggest how cancers with ATM mutations might evolve resistance in the clinic and how this may make these resistant cancers susceptible to other anti-cancer agents. Second, they suggest potential therapeutic targets for A-T.

Dr Gabriel Balmus from Dementia Research Institute at University of Cambridge, and Domenic Pilger, Jackson Lab Cancer Research UK graduate student, who are co-lead authors on the paper said: “We are excited by the publication of our research and by the possibility that it might improve cancer therapies and could lead to a therapeutic approach for the neurodegenerative disease A-T.”

Dr Josep Forment, Oncology team leader at AstraZeneca who is co-lead and co-corresponding author of the study added: “It has been wonderful collaborating with the group of Prof Steve Jackson to carry out these exciting studies. 

“My colleagues and I at AstraZeneca are now exploring how these findings might lead to the discovery of more effective cancer treatments.”

• PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS: Professor Steve Jackson

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2Ff9kx9

Posted in #UK

#UK Tech giants including Google and Intel turn to Cambridge deep learning ace

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Global technology giants have turned to a Cambridge UK deep learning pioneer to help steer a world first AI and ML collaboration.

myrtle.ai has assembled a globally renowned team of experts with expertise in producing low power inference circuits and already works with quoted businesses on both sides of the Atlantic.

Now it has been chosen to develop a Speech Recognition benchmark for MLPerf – a new Machine Learning (ML) benchmarking competition backed by Google, Baidu, Intel and AMD.

MLPerf, a collaboration of tech giants and researchers from numerous universities including Harvard, Stanford and the University of California Berkeley, is aspiring to drive progress in ML by developing a suite of fair and reliable benchmarks for emerging artificial intelligence hardware and software platforms.

myrtle.ai has been selected to provide the computer code that will be the benchmark standard for the Speech Recognition division. The code is a new implementation of two AI models known as DeepSpeech 1 and DeepSpeech 2, building on models originally developed by Baidu.

CEO Peter Baldwin (pictured) said: “We are honoured to be providing the reference implementations for the Speech to Text category of MLPerf. Myrtle has a world-class machine learning group and we are pleased to be able to provide the code as open source so that everyone can benefit from it.” 

Baldwin says this is the first time the AI community has come together to try to develop a series of reliable, transparent and vendor-neutral ML benchmarks to highlight performance differences between different ML algorithms and cloud configurations. 

The new benchmarking suite will be used to test and measure training speeds and inference times for a range of ML tasks.

myrtle ai’s Speech Recognition benchmark is based on proven experience in this field. Its core R & D team has speeded up Mozilla’s DeepSpeech implementations 100-fold when training on Librispeech, demonstrating their practical experience of training and deploying AI and ML algorithms.

Myrtle was founded to develop software and services for public and private data centres. Originally specialising in image processing and large scale simulation Myrtle helped produce computer generated content for over 20 major Hollywood blockbusters.

Clients have included NYSE and NASDAQ listed companies in LA, Vancouver and London as well as a major automotive OEM and a government department. 

The company is currently targeting its technology at inference workloads in data centres and is involved in a major collaboration to address the safety and verification challenges that currently preventing sophisticated deep learning networks being used in road vehicles.

Peter Baldwin has run Myrtle since founding it. He has a pure mathematics PhD from Cambridge University and a special interest in the mathematical foundations of deep learning.

He wrote and licensed Myrtle’s first commercially available software: a suite of simulation tools that ran at huge scale in private data centres. The first commercial software he ever wrote was used to help produce the chocolate river in Tim Burton’s film ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’.

The celebrated founder of Cambridge Angels, Robert Sansom, is a director while another angel and entrepreneur Robert Swann, who was a first mover in the enterprise, is also on the board; two other companies that benefit from his advice are Audio Analytic and Undo Software – both global leaders in their fields of tech specialism.

From world-changing self-driving car projects to reducing the power consumption of global data centres, myrtle.ai strives to use its engineering expertise to transform the world today by making tomorrow’s AI run with unsurpassed efficiency on low power hardware.

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2RAn2jQ

Posted in #UK

#UK Tech giants including Google and Intel turn to Cambridge deep learning ace

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Global technology giants have turned to a Cambridge UK deep learning pioneer to help steer a world first AI and ML collaboration.

myrtle.ai has assembled a globally renowned team of experts with expertise in producing low power inference circuits and already works with quoted businesses on both sides of the Atlantic.

Now it has been chosen to develop a Speech Recognition benchmark for MLPerf – a new Machine Learning (ML) benchmarking competition backed by Google, Baidu, Intel and AMD.

MLPerf, a collaboration of tech giants and researchers from numerous universities including Harvard, Stanford and the University of California Berkeley, is aspiring to drive progress in ML by developing a suite of fair and reliable benchmarks for emerging artificial intelligence hardware and software platforms.

myrtle.ai has been selected to provide the computer code that will be the benchmark standard for the Speech Recognition division. The code is a new implementation of two AI models known as DeepSpeech 1 and DeepSpeech 2, building on models originally developed by Baidu.

CEO Peter Baldwin (pictured) said: “We are honoured to be providing the reference implementations for the Speech to Text category of MLPerf. Myrtle has a world-class machine learning group and we are pleased to be able to provide the code as open source so that everyone can benefit from it.” 

Baldwin says this is the first time the AI community has come together to try to develop a series of reliable, transparent and vendor-neutral ML benchmarks to highlight performance differences between different ML algorithms and cloud configurations. 

The new benchmarking suite will be used to test and measure training speeds and inference times for a range of ML tasks.

myrtle ai’s Speech Recognition benchmark is based on proven experience in this field. Its core R & D team has speeded up Mozilla’s DeepSpeech implementations 100-fold when training on Librispeech, demonstrating their practical experience of training and deploying AI and ML algorithms.

Myrtle was founded to develop software and services for public and private data centres. Originally specialising in image processing and large scale simulation Myrtle helped produce computer generated content for over 20 major Hollywood blockbusters.

Clients have included NYSE and NASDAQ listed companies in LA, Vancouver and London as well as a major automotive OEM and a government department. 

The company is currently targeting its technology at inference workloads in data centres and is involved in a major collaboration to address the safety and verification challenges that currently preventing sophisticated deep learning networks being used in road vehicles.

Peter Baldwin has run Myrtle since founding it. He has a pure mathematics PhD from Cambridge University and a special interest in the mathematical foundations of deep learning.

He wrote and licensed Myrtle’s first commercially available software: a suite of simulation tools that ran at huge scale in private data centres. The first commercial software he ever wrote was used to help produce the chocolate river in Tim Burton’s film ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’.

The celebrated founder of Cambridge Angels, Robert Sansom, is a director while another angel and entrepreneur Robert Swann, who was a first mover in the enterprise, is also on the board; two other companies that benefit from his advice are Audio Analytic and Undo Software – both global leaders in their fields of tech specialism.

From world-changing self-driving car projects to reducing the power consumption of global data centres, myrtle.ai strives to use its engineering expertise to transform the world today by making tomorrow’s AI run with unsurpassed efficiency on low power hardware.

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2RAn2jQ

Posted in #UK

#UK Tech giants including Google and Intel turn to Cambridge deep learning ace

//

Global technology giants have turned to a Cambridge UK deep learning pioneer to help steer a world first AI and ML collaboration.

myrtle.ai has assembled a globally renowned team of experts with expertise in producing low power inference circuits and already works with quoted businesses on both sides of the Atlantic.

Now it has been chosen to develop a Speech Recognition benchmark for MLPerf – a new Machine Learning (ML) benchmarking competition backed by Google, Baidu, Intel and AMD.

MLPerf, a collaboration of tech giants and researchers from numerous universities including Harvard, Stanford and the University of California Berkeley, is aspiring to drive progress in ML by developing a suite of fair and reliable benchmarks for emerging artificial intelligence hardware and software platforms.

myrtle.ai has been selected to provide the computer code that will be the benchmark standard for the Speech Recognition division. The code is a new implementation of two AI models known as DeepSpeech 1 and DeepSpeech 2, building on models originally developed by Baidu.

CEO Peter Baldwin (pictured) said: “We are honoured to be providing the reference implementations for the Speech to Text category of MLPerf. Myrtle has a world-class machine learning group and we are pleased to be able to provide the code as open source so that everyone can benefit from it.” 

Baldwin says this is the first time the AI community has come together to try to develop a series of reliable, transparent and vendor-neutral ML benchmarks to highlight performance differences between different ML algorithms and cloud configurations. 

The new benchmarking suite will be used to test and measure training speeds and inference times for a range of ML tasks.

myrtle ai’s Speech Recognition benchmark is based on proven experience in this field. Its core R & D team has speeded up Mozilla’s DeepSpeech implementations 100-fold when training on Librispeech, demonstrating their practical experience of training and deploying AI and ML algorithms.

Myrtle was founded to develop software and services for public and private data centres. Originally specialising in image processing and large scale simulation Myrtle helped produce computer generated content for over 20 major Hollywood blockbusters.

Clients have included NYSE and NASDAQ listed companies in LA, Vancouver and London as well as a major automotive OEM and a government department. 

The company is currently targeting its technology at inference workloads in data centres and is involved in a major collaboration to address the safety and verification challenges that currently preventing sophisticated deep learning networks being used in road vehicles.

Peter Baldwin has run Myrtle since founding it. He has a pure mathematics PhD from Cambridge University and a special interest in the mathematical foundations of deep learning.

He wrote and licensed Myrtle’s first commercially available software: a suite of simulation tools that ran at huge scale in private data centres. The first commercial software he ever wrote was used to help produce the chocolate river in Tim Burton’s film ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’.

The celebrated founder of Cambridge Angels, Robert Sansom, is a director while another angel and entrepreneur Robert Swann, who was a first mover in the enterprise, is also on the board; two other companies that benefit from his advice are Audio Analytic and Undo Software – both global leaders in their fields of tech specialism.

From world-changing self-driving car projects to reducing the power consumption of global data centres, myrtle.ai strives to use its engineering expertise to transform the world today by making tomorrow’s AI run with unsurpassed efficiency on low power hardware.

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2RAn2jQ

Posted in #UK

#UK Tech giants including Google and Intel turn to Cambridge deep learning ace

//

Global technology giants have turned to a Cambridge UK deep learning pioneer to help steer a world first AI and ML collaboration.

myrtle.ai has assembled a globally renowned team of experts with expertise in producing low power inference circuits and already works with quoted businesses on both sides of the Atlantic.

Now it has been chosen to develop a Speech Recognition benchmark for MLPerf – a new Machine Learning (ML) benchmarking competition backed by Google, Baidu, Intel and AMD.

MLPerf, a collaboration of tech giants and researchers from numerous universities including Harvard, Stanford and the University of California Berkeley, is aspiring to drive progress in ML by developing a suite of fair and reliable benchmarks for emerging artificial intelligence hardware and software platforms.

myrtle.ai has been selected to provide the computer code that will be the benchmark standard for the Speech Recognition division. The code is a new implementation of two AI models known as DeepSpeech 1 and DeepSpeech 2, building on models originally developed by Baidu.

CEO Peter Baldwin (pictured) said: “We are honoured to be providing the reference implementations for the Speech to Text category of MLPerf. Myrtle has a world-class machine learning group and we are pleased to be able to provide the code as open source so that everyone can benefit from it.” 

Baldwin says this is the first time the AI community has come together to try to develop a series of reliable, transparent and vendor-neutral ML benchmarks to highlight performance differences between different ML algorithms and cloud configurations. 

The new benchmarking suite will be used to test and measure training speeds and inference times for a range of ML tasks.

myrtle ai’s Speech Recognition benchmark is based on proven experience in this field. Its core R & D team has speeded up Mozilla’s DeepSpeech implementations 100-fold when training on Librispeech, demonstrating their practical experience of training and deploying AI and ML algorithms.

Myrtle was founded to develop software and services for public and private data centres. Originally specialising in image processing and large scale simulation Myrtle helped produce computer generated content for over 20 major Hollywood blockbusters.

Clients have included NYSE and NASDAQ listed companies in LA, Vancouver and London as well as a major automotive OEM and a government department. 

The company is currently targeting its technology at inference workloads in data centres and is involved in a major collaboration to address the safety and verification challenges that currently preventing sophisticated deep learning networks being used in road vehicles.

Peter Baldwin has run Myrtle since founding it. He has a pure mathematics PhD from Cambridge University and a special interest in the mathematical foundations of deep learning.

He wrote and licensed Myrtle’s first commercially available software: a suite of simulation tools that ran at huge scale in private data centres. The first commercial software he ever wrote was used to help produce the chocolate river in Tim Burton’s film ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’.

The celebrated founder of Cambridge Angels, Robert Sansom, is a director while another angel and entrepreneur Robert Swann, who was a first mover in the enterprise, is also on the board; two other companies that benefit from his advice are Audio Analytic and Undo Software – both global leaders in their fields of tech specialism.

From world-changing self-driving car projects to reducing the power consumption of global data centres, myrtle.ai strives to use its engineering expertise to transform the world today by making tomorrow’s AI run with unsurpassed efficiency on low power hardware.

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2RAn2jQ

Posted in #UK

#UK Tech giants including Google and Intel turn to Cambridge deep learning ace

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Global technology giants have turned to a Cambridge UK deep learning pioneer to help steer a world first AI and ML collaboration.

myrtle.ai has assembled a globally renowned team of experts with expertise in producing low power inference circuits and already works with quoted businesses on both sides of the Atlantic.

Now it has been chosen to develop a Speech Recognition benchmark for MLPerf – a new Machine Learning (ML) benchmarking competition backed by Google, Baidu, Intel and AMD.

MLPerf, a collaboration of tech giants and researchers from numerous universities including Harvard, Stanford and the University of California Berkeley, is aspiring to drive progress in ML by developing a suite of fair and reliable benchmarks for emerging artificial intelligence hardware and software platforms.

myrtle.ai has been selected to provide the computer code that will be the benchmark standard for the Speech Recognition division. The code is a new implementation of two AI models known as DeepSpeech 1 and DeepSpeech 2, building on models originally developed by Baidu.

CEO Peter Baldwin (pictured) said: “We are honoured to be providing the reference implementations for the Speech to Text category of MLPerf. Myrtle has a world-class machine learning group and we are pleased to be able to provide the code as open source so that everyone can benefit from it.” 

Baldwin says this is the first time the AI community has come together to try to develop a series of reliable, transparent and vendor-neutral ML benchmarks to highlight performance differences between different ML algorithms and cloud configurations. 

The new benchmarking suite will be used to test and measure training speeds and inference times for a range of ML tasks.

myrtle ai’s Speech Recognition benchmark is based on proven experience in this field. Its core R & D team has speeded up Mozilla’s DeepSpeech implementations 100-fold when training on Librispeech, demonstrating their practical experience of training and deploying AI and ML algorithms.

Myrtle was founded to develop software and services for public and private data centres. Originally specialising in image processing and large scale simulation Myrtle helped produce computer generated content for over 20 major Hollywood blockbusters.

Clients have included NYSE and NASDAQ listed companies in LA, Vancouver and London as well as a major automotive OEM and a government department. 

The company is currently targeting its technology at inference workloads in data centres and is involved in a major collaboration to address the safety and verification challenges that currently preventing sophisticated deep learning networks being used in road vehicles.

Peter Baldwin has run Myrtle since founding it. He has a pure mathematics PhD from Cambridge University and a special interest in the mathematical foundations of deep learning.

He wrote and licensed Myrtle’s first commercially available software: a suite of simulation tools that ran at huge scale in private data centres. The first commercial software he ever wrote was used to help produce the chocolate river in Tim Burton’s film ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’.

The celebrated founder of Cambridge Angels, Robert Sansom, is a director while another angel and entrepreneur Robert Swann, who was a first mover in the enterprise, is also on the board; two other companies that benefit from his advice are Audio Analytic and Undo Software – both global leaders in their fields of tech specialism.

From world-changing self-driving car projects to reducing the power consumption of global data centres, myrtle.ai strives to use its engineering expertise to transform the world today by making tomorrow’s AI run with unsurpassed efficiency on low power hardware.

from Business Weekly http://bit.ly/2RAn2jQ

Posted in #UK