#Asia #Japan DJ Selects: How this Musical Shoe is Helping Hospitals

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Most great startup ideas don’t grab your attention right away. It takes a while before the founder’s vision becomes obvious to the rest of us. On the other hand, the startups that immediately grab all the press attention often go out of business shortly after shipping their first product. Reality never seems to live up to the promise.

And then there are products like Orphe. This LED-emblazoned, WiFi-connected, social-network enabled dancing shoe seems made for fluffy, flashy Facebook sharing, but only when you really dig into it, do you understand what it really is and the potential it has in the marketplace.

Today we sit down with Yuya Kikukawa, founder of No New Folk Studio and the creator of the Orphe, and we talk about music, hardware financing, and why this amazing little shoe is finding early adopters in places from game designers to hospitals.

It’s a great conversation, and I think you’ll really enjoy it.

Show Notes

The inspiration for musical shoes
Why Yuya’s first musical instrument attempt was a failure

The biggest challenge in moving from prototype to production
Orphe’s technical specs
How Orphe is being used in hospitals and other healthcare applications
How small Japanese startups can achieve global distribution
Where the next big startup opportunities in Japan will be
Why most hardware startups fail

Links from the Founder

No New Folk Studio Hompage
See Orphe in action
Check out Yuya’s blog
Follow Yuya on Facebook
Check out PocoPoco on YouTube

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Transcript
Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.

I’m Tim Romero, and thanks for joining me.

As expected, my new Google duties are taking a lot of my time and taking me out of Japan quite a bit. Things will be returning to normal soon, but in the meantime, I wanted to bring you a special selects show with a really interesting update.

Yuya Kikukawa first sat down together a few years ago to talk about shoes, but if you listened to the last episode of Disrupting Japan you know that when you are talking about shoes you are never really talking about shoes.

In this case, the shoes in question are the Orphe, and they are a combination musical instrument and social network, and yeah that will make a lot more sense when you listen to the interview. And we also talk about what defines a musical instrument, the unique challenges of Japanese hardware startups, and the nature of innovation.

Oh, and I also have some news. In our conversation, Yuya and I debated a strategic decision that all hardware startups face, and just last month we finally got our answer.  I’ll tell you about it in the update after the show.

Intro
You know, most good startups are obvious. I don’t mean that I could have had the idea before the founders did. By obvious, I mean that right away you can understand the problem the company is solving for their customers and how they’re doing it. Naturally, that makes it easier for the customers to buy.

Most non-obvious startups are in reality still struggling to find the product market fit and are probably not long for this world. And then there are products like Orphe, an LED-emblazoned WiFi-connected social sharing enabled dancing shoe. Yeah, it sounds like something you would find on Indiegogo and that one time not too long ago, it was. But when I sat down with Yuya Kikukawa, founder of No New Folk Studio and the creator of the Orphe, it became clear that this was not some quirky side project or some overfunded crazy hardware startup.

This was something really different.

We talked about the original inspiration for the shoe and what does and does not qualify as a musical instrument and how Orphe is being used by the artistic community in Japan. But we also dive into the technology inside it, and that, well, that’s something special.

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#Asia #Japan Why Japan’s #KuToo is Not Really About Shoes

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Today I am going to correct two big mistakes; one of my own and one of society’s.

I lot of listeners emailed me about the comments I made regarding how Japanese companies treat their employees and customers while they are pregnant. I got it wrong, so I would like to set the record straight.

I also explain what I see as the obvious answer to the current #KuToo controversy. I realize that this puts me at serious risk of having to publish another retraction, but I think it’s an important way of looking at this problem.

Please enjoy, and let me know what you think.

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Transcript
Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.
I’m Tim Romero, and thanks for joining me.
As expected, my crazy Google travel schedule has caused me reschedule some of my interviews, but I promise that I’ll get back to talking with some of Japan’s most amazing startup founders really soon.
Today, however, I want to talk about the feedback I received from my recent discussion with Miku Hirano about how pregnant women are treated at work in Japan, and specifically, about my comments in the outro of that episode.
Hey, when I screw up, I have no problem admitting that I screwed up, and boy did I step in it this time.   
So today, I want to set the record straight on what it’s like for women working at startups and at large enterprises here in Japan. Oh yes, and we are also going to tak about shoes.
And yeah, I totally understand how strange it is for a white guy to stand behind a microphone and talk about the situation women face in Japan. I’ll get to that in a minute, but first, let me explain what I got wrong, and let me set the record straight.
In our conversation, Miku told the story of how supportive her clients and prospective clients had been while she was pregnant. Doing things like adjusting their schedules and coming to her office for meetings, where Japanese business protocol would require that she visit them.
Both Miku and I were surprised and delighted that so many Japanese salarymen, who have a reputation for being rather sexist, voluntarily went out of their way to accommodate her and to make things just a little bit easier for her while she was expecting.
In the outtro, I speculated that this outpouring of support might be because she was a startup CEO, and many of the traditional rules of Japanese business etiquette don’t seem to apply to startups, and I mused that her experience might have been very different if she had worked at a more traditional Japanese company.
Well, I was wrong. I was really wrong. And in fact, I have to say that I’m pretty happy that I was wrong about this. Let me explain what happened….
After that episode aired, I received a lot of email from female listeners working at large Japanese companies who explained that both their clients and their companies made exactly the same kinds of accommodations for them when they were pregnant.
And I also heard from a few senior managers and HR professionals telling me that I got it wrong. They gave me examples of how they had made a point of traveling to visit a vendor who was pregnant or broke up long meetings into multiple short ones to make things more manageable for pregnant employees or visitors.
So I got it wrong. And that’s awesome!
But I can’t just leave it there.  I probably should, but I mean something still doesn’t fit. There is a great deal of gender discrimination in Japan. Both international organizations and Japanese NGOs consistantly rank Japan very poorly in this regard. In fact, the World Economic Forum’s Gender Gap Report ranked Japan 110th out of 149 countries.
And then there are things like Tokyo Medical University marking down girl’s scores on the entrance exams to ensure “enough” boys would get in.
So how do we reconcile this seeming contradiction?  The independent research showing that discrimination exists is consistent and respected,

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#Asia #Japan Big News for Disrupting Japan! – Japan Startup News

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There is big news for Tim and for Disrupting Japan this week.

It’s a very short episode, and I have no special links or show notes this time around. Please give the show a listen for the big reveal, and please accept my sincere thanks for all your support over the years.

Disrupting Japan is just getting started. The best is yet to come.

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Transcript
— vintage news sounds —
This is a Disrupting Japan news flash.
We are broadcasting live from Tokyo, Japan to bring you today’s breaking news.
In just a few minutes from now, we will be witness to ….
Hold on. Let me turn this thing off.
OK. That’s better.
So, this is the first episode of Disrupting Japan ever that has not been released early on a Tuesday morning Japan time, so as you might expect, something big is going on.
In fact, this evening we’re announcing it at a press conference. Tomorrow you may be reading about it in news articles or blogs, but I wanted you to hear it from me first.
Because you, the Disrupting Japan listeners, are a big part of what has led to this, and as you’ll see, I think that you are going to be a big part of what’s to come.
Some of you are new fans, and that’s great. The podcast keeps growing steadily every month.
And some of you have been with me since the very beginning and you were with me as my ContractBeast startup went under. You were part of my Crowd-Sourcing-My-Career project. You were part of my journey to becoming Japan’s first professional podcaster, and with me when I decided to take the show non-commercial in order to work with energy startups at TEPCO.
So it’s only fair that I let you know what’s coming next.
I’m joining Google as the new Head of Google for Startups Japan.
So what exactly does Google for Startups do?  Officially, it’s “Google’s initiative to help startups thrive across every corner of the world. Bringing together the best of Google’s products, connections, and best practices to enable startups to build something better.”
And that’s, admittedly, pretty cool.
In practice, however, what Google for Startups Japan will become is largely up to us. Google for Startups has different programs in different countries, and this is an amazing chance to create something unique for Japan and to make a real impact for Japanese startups.
I have a lot of ideas, but I want to hear from you are well. If you are out there growing your startup in Japan, let me know what are some of the biggest challenges that you could use some help with. Or if you’ve already overcome those challenges, let me know what kind of resources and advice you wish you had access to back then.
I’ll need your help to really make this work.
So, what does all this mean for Disrupting Japan? Well, good things mostly. Google is being very supportive of the show, and with the audience as large and engaged as it is now, I don’t think I could stop even if I wanted to.
However, my travel schedule for the next few months is absolutely crazy — even by my standards, so interviews will be hard to arrange. But we’ll make it work.
I might be able to squeeze in interviews on the few days I’m in town and edit them on airplanes. Or maybe I’ll get a chance to interview Japanese founders in the countries I’ll be visiting. Or maybe I’ll bring my microphones with me, make a little pillow-fort studio in my hotel room and record some shorter solo shows on the road.
I don’t know, but I’ll make it work. I haven’t missed an episode in the five and a half years since I started Disrupting Japan and I’m not going to miss one now.  Format-wise,  content-wise, things will return to normal in a few months.
So I’m incredibly excited about this new opportunity. I mean its a chance for me to work full time with Japan’s startup founders to further develop Japan’s startup community. And that’s pretty much a dream job for me.
But there is something else here, and it’s something that I don’t think anyone looking at Japan’s startups fr…

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#Asia #Japan The Ultimate Guide to Raising Money in Japan

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There has never been a better time to raising money in Japan than right now.

Founders ask me about fundraising more than any other topic, so this guide is long overdue. There are links that cover the basics in the Show Notes, and I will be keeping this page updated as new information becomes available and members of the community create new resources.

Calling something “The Ultime Guide” to anything is a pretty big claim, and I’ll do my best to make sure this page lives up to it.

Please enjoy.

Show Notes

Results of the “Why Meet a Founder?” survey
Directories of Japanese VC firms

Japan Venture Capital Membership
Crunchbase’s list of Japanese VCs
The Bridge: not a directory, but a good source of Japanese funding announcements

How to pitch like a Pro

Dave McClure’s original guide to pitching VCs – Very much substance over style

The same information in a more readable format
Dave’s deck redesigned by people who do care about style

What you need to put in your pitch deck – an infographic
Design advice for pitch decks  – more geared towards pitch contents

Advice from Japanese VCs

James Riney talks about the VC business model and gives pitching advice
Disrupting Japan’s live show on fundraising in Japan
Hiro Maeda on fundraising in Japan
Ikuo Hirasishi provides an overview of Japan’s VC landscape
More from James Riney back when he was with 500 startups

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Transcript
Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.

I’m Tim Romero and thanks for joining me.
Today, I am going to answer the question that everyone seems to be asking. Or at least the question that everyone seems to be asking me.
I am going to explain how to raise money as a new startup founder in Japan.
You know, it’s funny how things work out. I originally planned to write this episode a few months ago as a short-take on a focused topic while I fished up my episode about the history of software engineering in Japan, but the topic kind of got away from me.
My first draft and notes for the show came in at over 24,000 words, which by the time I fleshed it all out would have ended up as a four -hour podcast, and even I can’t stand to listen to me for four hours.
So I’ve had to make some cuts, some painful ones. This episode should be under an hour, but it requires that I speak in generalities and make a few over-broad statements. There are a few really important topics that I will just mention briefly before moving on.
So, if while you are listening to this episode, particularly my VC listeners, and you find yourself thinking that I would explain a particular point in more detail and with more nuance, or wishing that I would dive deeper into specific strategies and scenarios …   Yeah. Me too. But we’ll save that for another podcast or maybe a conversation over a beer.
Now, there are a few very important questions you need to ask before you even decide to seek VC money. Things like “How do you plan on using those funds?” and “Are you sure you understand the growth-driven management style you are signing up for here?”
But, from my experience, relatively few founders really want to dive into those topics. No, what founders in Japan really want to know is how to raise money. So that’s what we are going to talk about.
I’m going to give you a clear and actionable plan so that:

You can decide which VCs you should approach
You can set up meetings with partners at reputable Japanese VC firms
You how to pitch in the most effective way possible
You will have some strategies to help you actually close the round, and get the money in the bank.

And you’ll be able to do it all in a reasonable amount of time without going absolutely crazy
Now, I’ll warn you. Each of these steps is significantly harder than the one before, but you’ll be building up your skills as you move through the process.

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#Asia #Japan How Japan’s forgotten past can stop IoT’s dystopian future

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Technology is global, but ideas are local.

The same IoT technology is being deployed all over the world, but a small Japanese startup might be who helps us make sense of it all.

There is amazing work being done in user experience design, but most designers are operating with the contract of keeping users engaged. This is a fundamental shift from the traditional user-centered and functional design approaches.

Today we sit down with Kaz Oki, founder of Mui Labs, and we talk about user design can actually improve our lives and help us disengage.

We also talk about the challenges of getting VCs to invest in hardware startups, why Kyoto might be Japan’s next innovation hub, and what it takes for a startup to successfully spin out of a Japanese company

It’s a great discussion, and I think you will really enjoy it.

Show Notes

How Japanese design philosophy informs user interface design
How UI design got so bad

Who are the early technology adopters in Japan
Why VCs hesitate to invest in hardware companies
How to pitch corporate management to let you spin out a startup
Why you should run a Kickstarter even when you have corporate backing
Why a major manufacturer decided to outsource innovative manufacturing
The secret to making corporate spinouts work in Japan
How to convince Japanese employees to join a spinout
How to get middle-management on-board with corporate spinouts
What changed in Kyoto to make it one of Japan’s best startup hubs

Links from the Founder

Everything you ever wanted to know about Mui Labs
Check out the Mui Kickstarter
Keep up-to-date on the Mui Blog
Check them out on Facebook
Follow Kaz on Twitter @mui_labo

Leave a comment
Transcript
Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.

I’m Tim Romero and thanks for joining me.

If you’re a fan of Disrupting Japan, you know that I have a strong dislike for attempts to make Japan sound too exotic and this goes in both directions. On one side, we have consultants who claim that Japanese business practices are so unique, arcane, and confusing that the only way westerners can possibly understand them is by paying large sums of money to consultants such as themselves.

And on the other side, of course, we have people insisting that foreigners can’t really understand Japanese anime without a thorough and nuanced knowledge of Japanese language and history.

It’s all utter nonsense. I mean, there are differences, of course, and those differences should be acknowledged and respected, but whether an idea is coming from Japan or America, or Germany, one true measure of the value of that idea is its universality. The most important achievements might emerge out of cultural biases or sensitivities but they address something universally true, something deeply human.

Today, we sit down with Kaz Oki of Mui Labs and we’re going to talk about Mui’s radical rethinking of how we should interact with computers and the different contexts for that interaction. The Mui itself is a tactile and visual user interface that literally fades into the furniture when you’re not using it.

Now, this interface is clearly informed by Japanese aesthetics. In fact, some of the deeper issues Kaz and I talked about kept bubbling up in my mind in the week following the interview, and Kaz and I are going to do a follow-up later over a couple of beers in Kyoto, but there’s nothing about the Mui design that looks particularly Japanese. It’s tapping into a deeper and more human design sense, and that’s far more interesting.

Oh, and Mui Labs also represents a very rare kind of startup, a creature far, far more rare than unicorns. Mui Labs is an innovative and successful Japanese corporate spin-out. We talk about how Kaz made that work, his valiant battles against multiple layers of middle management, and how he managed to recruit top startup talent into that company,

from Disrupting Japan: Startups and Innovation in Japan https://ift.tt/2QhwxSx

#Asia #Japan Japan leads the world in this one important brach of AI

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Technology develops differently in Japan.

While US tech giants have been grabbing artificial intelligence headlines, a business AI sector has been quietly maturing in Japan, and it is now making inroads into America.

Today we sit down again with Miku Hirano, CEO of Cinnamon, and we talk about how exactly this happened.

Interestingly, Cinnamon did not start out as an AI company. In fact, when Miku first came on the show, the company had just launched an innovative video-sharing service. Today, we talk about what lead to the pivot to AI and why even a great idea and a great team is no guarantee of success.

We also talk about some of the changing attitudes towards startups and women in Japan, the kinds of business practices AI will never change, and Miku give some practical advice for startups going into foreign markets.

It’s a great discussion, and I think you will really enjoy it.

Show Notes

How Miku invented TikTok before TickTok and why it didn’t work
How you know when  its time to pivot a startup
Why companies will never go digital and will always use paper
Who will benefit most from AI
The four categories of AI
How AI will change the legal profession
How japan is actually ahead of US and China in some kinds of AI
What’s really driving business innovation in Japan
Can AI actually reduce overtime?
How enterprise clients treat women founders

Links from the Founder

Everything you ever wanted to know about Cinnamon
Follow Miku on Twitter @mikuhirano
Friend her on Facebook
More about Cinnamon

Miku’s original Disrupting Japan interview
Eliminating Repetitive Office Work through Disruptive AI
Miku on the John Batchelor Show – Part I
Miku on the John Batchelor Show – Part II

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Transcript
 Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.

I’m Tim Romero and thanks for joining me.

Today, we’re going to sit down and talk about artificial intelligence with Miku Hirano of Cinnamon. Now, Cinnamon is actually a great example of a successful Japanese startup pivot. When we first sat down with Miku four years ago, she had an innovative micro-video sharing company called Tuya and really, you should go back and listen to that episode. I’ve put a link on the show notes and it was really a good one.

Anyway, Miku basically started TikTok a few years before TikTok and we talk about why things didn’t work out, why even with the same idea, one startup will become a multi-billion dollar brand and the other will pivot. Of course, the pivot to AI and the rebranding to Cinnamon has led this to their current success in using AI to read and to understand common business forms.

In fact, for reasons that Miku will explain during the interview, Japan is actually ahead of the US and China in the area of business AI. We’ll also talk about how attitudes towards women are changing here and how Japanese men at traditional companies treat women founders, particularly women founders with children, and I think it might surprise you. I mean, it surprised me and it surprised Miku as well,

But you know, Miku tells that story much better than I can, so let’s get right to the interview.

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Interview
Tim: So, I’m sitting here with Miku Hirano of Cinnamon and it’s great to have you back on the show again.

Miku: Yeah, thank you so much for having me here again.

Tim: Well, so much has changed since — it was three years ago, right?

Miku: Yeah, yeah, and I had a totally different business at the time.

Tim: Well, not only a totally different business but you’ve gotten married and you’ve had two kids.

Miku: Yeah, yeah, and at the time, I think I was living in Taiwan and now, my business is in Tokyo, so everything has changed.

Tim: And so, we’re not even going to cove what we talked about last time even though in the in…

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#Asia #Japan DJ Selects: Why Men Need Women Founders

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Ari Horie has always had a different approach to supporting women entrepreneurs.

She doesn’t talk about “empowering” women and sensitivity training is not in her toolkit. Ari is showing the startup world that incorporating some of the problem-solving skills and leadership techniques favored by women improves their chance of success.

Women having a leading role in entrepreneurship is not the socially responsible thing to do. It is the most profitable thing to do. Ari’s been on stage with some of the most powerful men in Japan including Prime Minister Abe and Hiroshi Mikitani of Rakuten, and her message is starting to take hold.

Entrepreneurship provides a much more level playing field than any other kind of business, and we should not be surprised that a lot of women excel here, and they often do it by doing things differently from their male competitors.

Startups that plan to survive need to use all the tools at their disposal, and Ari explains exactly how this is happening.

from Disrupting Japan: Startups and Innovation in Japan https://ift.tt/33gForN

#Asia #Japan An Inside Look at Japan’s Curious Coding Bootcamps

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The developed world is facing a severe programmer shortage. Around the world, coding boot camps have stepped into this gap to teach newcomers basic programming skills quickly.

But in like so many other areas, Japan is different.

Coding boot camps have been slow to take off here, and programmers are taught by a patchwork of academic degrees, on the job training, and informal meetups and study sessions.

Kani Munidasa, the co-founder of Code Chrysalis, is changing that. He’s started one of the first Western-style coding boot camps in Japan, and the ecosystem is already seeing the results. Code Chrysalis has an amazing placement rate with grads receiving above-average starting salaries, but there is something more going on here as well.

Kani and I talk about how the job market for programmers is changing in Japan and, more important perhaps, how their place in society is changing as well.

It’s a great conversation, and I think you’ll enjoy it.

Show Notes

Why Japanese engineers don’t participate in open source projects
The differences between Japanese and US junior developers
Divisristiy on a programming team does not main what you think it doe
How to learn to learn
Why Code Chrysalis turns down 80% of its applicants
Why Japanese enterprises are getting behind boot camps
Why developer pay in Japan is so low
Why so many engineers want to come to Japan anyway
How to overcome the need for degrees and certificates

Links from the Founder

Everything you wanted to know about Code Chrysalis
The Code Chrysalis blog
Friend Kani on Facebook
Follow him on Twitter @munidk
A research-based approach to coding education
How to Get Into Code Chrysalis

Leave a comment
Transcript
 Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.

I’m Tim Romero and thanks for joining me.

One of the most important developments in Japan over the past 10 years and perhaps, the most important way that things are different for startups today than they were 20 years ago is the existence of a startup ecosystem. Now, let me explain that because it’s not obvious, especially to younger entrepreneurs who have never had to run a startup the absence of a startup ecosystem.

A startup ecosystem is not just a group of startups that operate in the same city. We had that during the dotcom era. There were even VC investments, occasional meet ups, and some mentoring, but we didn’t really have an ecosystem back then. We had a community for sure, but not that ecosystem.

An ecosystem comes into being when startups start buying from and selling it to each other. When startups can target other startups with their innovative products, where our pool of employees move from startup to startup, taking their ideas and best practices, and work ethic with them. When an ecosystem developed, it’s an amazing cross-pollination of innovation and growth that is just awesome to be a part of. This is happening in Japan. It’s a relatively new and it’s fantastic.

Today, I’d like you to meet Kani Munidasa, co-founder of Code Chrysalis, a startup that can only exist within a healthy startup ecosystem but also one that any healthy startup ecosystem needs in order to grow. Code Chrysalis is a coding boot camp where over 12 weeks, students learn of the skills they need to get jobs as programmers in Tokyo and as you will soon see, they are really getting jobs.

In fact, after our conversation, there is something I want to ask you and I mean you, personally because it’s something that you might understand better than I do. I would ask you right now, but the question won’t really make a lot of sense until after you sit in on the conversation with me and Kani, and we cover a lot of ground.

We talk about how to get a programming job in Tokyo, how to ramp up skills quickly, and why diversity in programming might not mean what you think it does. But you know,

from Disrupting Japan: Startups and Innovation in Japan http://bit.ly/2CB5aM5

#Asia #Japan An inside look at Japan’s curious coding bootcamps

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The developed world is facing a severe programmer shortage. Around the world, coding boot camps have stepped into this gap to teach newcomers basic programming skills quickly.

But in like so many other areas, Japan is different.

Coding boot camps have been slow to take off here, and programmers are taught by a patchwork of academic degrees, on the job training, and informal meetups and study sessions.

Kani Munidasa, the co-founder of Code Chrysalis, is changing that. He’s started one of the first Western-style coding boot camps in Japan, and the ecosystem is already seeing the results. Code Chrysalis has an amazing placement rate with grads receiving above-average starting salaries, but there is something more going on here as well.

Kani and I talk about how the job market for programmers is changing in Japan and, more important perhaps, how their place in society is changing as well.

It’s a great conversation, and I think you’ll enjoy it.

Show Notes

Why Japanese engineers don’t participate in open source projects
The differences between Japanese and US junior developers
Divisristiy on a programming team does not main what you think it doe
How to learn to learn
Why Code Chrysalis turns down 80% of its applicants
Why Japanese enterprises are getting behind boot camps
Why developer pay in Japan is so low
Why so many engee4ers want to come to Japan anyway
How to overcome the need for degrees and certificates

Links from the Founder

Everything you wanted to know about Code Chrysalis
The Code Chrysalis blog
Friend Kani on Facebook
Follow him on Twitter @munidk
A research-based approach to coding education
How to Get Into Code Chrysalis

Leave a comment
Transcript
 Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan’s most successful entrepreneurs.

I’m Tim Romero and thanks for joining me.

One of the most important developments in Japan over the past 10 years and perhaps, the most important way that things are different for startups today than they were 20 years ago is the existence of a startup ecosystem. Now, let me explain that because it’s not obvious, especially to younger entrepreneurs who have never had to run a startup the absence of a startup ecosystem.

A startup ecosystem is not just a group of startups that operate in the same city. We had that during the dotcom era. There were even VC investments, occasional meet ups, and some mentoring, but we didn’t really have an ecosystem back then. We had a community for sure, but not that ecosystem.

An ecosystem comes into being when startups start buying from and selling it to each other. When startups can target other startups with their innovative products, where our pool of employees move from startup to startup, taking their ideas and best practices, and work ethic with them. When an ecosystem developed, it’s an amazing cross-pollination of innovation and growth that is just awesome to be a part of. This is happening in Japan. It’s a relatively new and it’s fantastic.

Today, I’d like you to meet Kani Munidasa, co-founder of Code Chrysalis, a startup that can only exist within a healthy startup ecosystem but also one that any healthy startup ecosystem needs in order to grow. Code Chrysalis is a coding boot camp where over 12 weeks, students learn of the skills they need to get jobs as programmers in Tokyo and as you will soon see, they are really getting jobs.

In fact, after our conversation, there is something I want to ask you and I mean you, personally because it’s something that you might understand better than I do. I would ask you right now, but the question won’t really make a lot of sense until after you sit in on the conversation with me and Kani, and we cover a lot of ground.

We talk about how to get a programming job in Tokyo, how to ramp up skills quickly, and why diversity in programming might not mean what you think it does. But you know,

from Disrupting Japan: Startups and Innovation in Japan http://bit.ly/2CB5aM5